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Segue 9: Fall 2010  ||  David Laskowski

 

about the author

         

David Laskowski lives in Madison, WI and teaches at Edgewood College.

   
 

about the work

 

I really wish I knew why I wrote, although, the truth is, I do not. In other words, although I know I enjoy writing and reading fiction, I am not sure I know why it is important and I am not sure I ever will. Yet, I still do it and I do not think, to the chagrin of my checking account, that I will ever stop.

Yet, it is because I do not that I wrote “In and Out,” and most likely why I write every story that I do. I think what I write is an attempt to discover in writing something meaningful. At the center of "In and Out" is the question of whether or not fiction, or literature, can be politically significant. Can it effect change?

To answer this question, I felt I needed to move past what might be considered the traditional short story which can be so often built on contrivances such as “Rowdy watched the prairie dogs run across the dusty gray gravel and felt at peace” or “Rowdy, like his father, liked his cigarettes unfiltered.” In other “words, I did not want to be bound to description. I wanted to feel free to speak to the story's theoretical concerns.

The biggest challenge in writing “In and Out” was walking the fine line, in the words of Spinal Tap's David St. Hubbins, between stupid and clever. In other words, is a talking dog absolutely necessary? I guess I decided that, in the end, like everything else in the story, it was, and probably because a talking dog was just as believable as fiction that could change the world.

   
 

David Laskowski on the web

 

www.essaysandfictions.com/vol_6/lASKOWSKI.pdf

www.h-ngm-n.com/h_ngm_n10/david-laskowski.html

cafeirreal.alicewhittenburg.com/laskowski.htm

forgejournal.com/forge/2010/04/01/the-short-history-of-the-short-story/

   
   

 

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